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Congratulations end best wishes to- 
day on their 2Tth wedding anniversary 
to Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge. 







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WORCESTER YOUNGSTERS 
< GREETED BY GOV ELY 

The crop-growing -winners of the 
Worcester "Garden City," numbering 
360 boys and girls, made their annual 
visit to the State House yesterday and 
were greeted by Gov Ely. The Gov- 
ernor was assisted in receiving the 
youthful visitors by Mayor Mahoney of 
Worcester. 

Mary Foley, one of the pupils, pre- 
sented the Governor a large basket of 
Rowers grown in "Garden City." The 
pupils also visited the Hall of Flags 
and sang patriotic songs. 

The yearly winners in crop growing 
have been taken into Boston by Mrs 
R. J. Floody since 1911. 



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Waiter, My Shawl! 

• 

The New York Sun is ill at ease over j 
the report that the fashion of wearing 
shawls by men may be revived this win- 
ter. It recalls that Lincoln wore a shawl, 
"but nature designed him so that he 
would not look ridiculous in one. His 
opponent in the Lincoln-Douglas debates 
would have made a less impressive figure 
in a shawl." 

Yet the chances are that Douglas, like 
many men of the decade between 1855 
and 1865, wore a blanket shawl in winter 
weather. Old daguerreotypes show our 
grandsires, short and long, thick and 
thin, draped with them. A shawl helped 
in those days to mitigate the rigors of 
travel in railroad cars that were not 
heated as ours are, and in street-cars, 
busses and sleighs that were not heated 
at all. Lincoln took a shawl with him on 
his journey from Springfield to Wash- 
ington in February, 1861, and his ene- 
mies used it as the pretext for dissemi- 
nating the slander that he slipped into 
the capital disguised as a woman. Four 
years later, when Jefferson Davis fled 
from Richmond, on the fall of the Con- 
federacy, he wore a shawl and was ac- 
cused in some quarters of trying to 
escape in his wife's clothes. Evidently, 
then, the practice was not so general 
that it was not ridiculed as an effemi- 
nacy and made use of for purposes of 
disparagement. At any rate, the fash- 
ion seems not to have survived the Civil 
War and was superseded for a while by 
that of the long cape-overcoat, the cape 
serving the purpose of the discarded 
shawl. It is easier to keep warm now- 
adays than it was sixty and seventy 
years ago and we think it will be a long 
time before the mantles of Lincoln and 
Davis fall upon this generation in the 
way that has awakened the apprehen- 
sions of the Sun. 



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200,000 Webster Stamps 
Sold on Day of Issue 

[Special Dispatch to The Herald] 
EXETER, N. H., Oct. 24— Nearly 
200,000 of the 300,000 Webster 
Memorial stamps allotted to Exeter 
were disposed of today, the first day 
they were placed on sale. The 
stamps are sold only here and at 
Hanover, where Daniel Webster at- 
tended school, and at Franklin, 
where he was born. Webster died 80 
years ago today. Most of the stamps 
bought today were ordered by phila- 
telists who sent their orders from 
all over the world. 




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New and Retiring Deans of Tufts Theological School 




Dr. Clarence R. Skinner (left) and Dr. Lee S. McCollester Whom he Succeeds 



ANNOUNCEMENT was made today 
by President John A. Cousens of 
L Tufts that at the recent meeting 
of the trustees the resignation of Dr. 
Lee S. MoColleater, dean of the Theo- 
logical School, was accepted. At the 
same time the appoiptment of Dr. Clar- 
ence R. Skinner as new dean of the 
school was confirmed. Dr. McCollester's 
retirement will not mean a complete sev- 
erance of relations with the college and 
the School of Religion. He will remain 
as dean emeritus and will teach two or 
three courses in religious literature. He 
has been connected with the college for 
twenty-one years as head of the Theo- 
logical School and has seen the school 
grow from four students housed in un- 
attractive quarters to a school of forty- 
five .students living in attractive sur- 
roundings and having an adequate plant 
at their disposal. Several years ago he 



was the moving spirit in the drive for 
funds for the "recent additions to the 
theological school, including a new 
chapel and a library for the use of stu- 
dents of the school, and the remodeling 
of Miner and Page halls. At one time 
he served as president of the Universal- 
ist General ( Convention. He has done 
considerable' preaching among the liberal 
churches in New England, and at one 
time held a long and very successful pas- 
torate in Detroit, Mich., where his church 
became a center for public work which 
was felt throughout the whole city. 

Dr. Skinner, the incoming dean, has 
been associated with the college since 
1914 as professor of applied Christianity, 
and has acted as vice dean since 1929. 
Previous to 1914, he was minister at the 
Universalist Church in Lowell. His minis- 
terial fellowship lies with the Universal- 
ist Church, and he is a trustee of St. 
Lawrence University. As a teacher he is 



well liked by the students, is well traveled 
and is himself really a student. He is 
chairman of the board of the Community 
Church in Boston and leader of its serv- 
ices. In connection with the history of 
the college it is interesting to note that 
one of his ancestors, Rev. Otis A. Skin- 
ner, an 1851 raised the first $100,000 on 
which the college was founded. His 
grandmother. .Mrs. Skinner, founded the 
Cornelia Skinner Fellowship, which was 
the first scholarship for women in the 
college. Three other members of his 
family are holders of degrees from the 
college: Dr. Charles A. Skinner was 
given his doctor of divinity degree in 
1904; Otis Skinner, the actor, the honor- 
ary master of arts in 1895, and Charles 
M. Skinner, father of the dean, the de- 
gree Litt. D. in 1901. Dr. Skinner is au- 
thor of two books, "Social Implications 
of Universallsm" and "The Free Pulpit 
in Action." 





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Horovnjxi lie Mulmilien '» num. HC1). 

Horoscope case in 1867, indicat- 
ing the death of the Emperor 
Maximilen. 



FAMOUS WOMAN 
ASTROLOGER DIES 



Evangeline Adams, Who Read 

Horoscopes of 100,000, 

Was in 73d Year 

H*y«V^ 

NEW YORK. Nov. 10 (AP)— Evange- 
line Adams, widely known astrologer, 
died suddenly today in her studio 
apartment. 

Miss Adams, who in private life was 
Mrs. George E. Jordan, Jr., had been 
ill about a week. Her husband was 
at the bedside when death came. 

The 72-year-old astrologer became ill 
last Saturday when she suffered a 
stroke after taking a hot bath. A sec- 
ond stroke occurred this morning, Dr. 
Harry Britenstool said, bringing a cere- 
bral hemorrhage. 

Miss Adams travelled extensively, 
studying in several countries, and an- 
swering the letters of thousands who 
wrote to her for advice on all kinds of 
subjects. She wrote articles for news- 
papers and gave lectures. 

Recently she estimated she had read 
the horoscopes of more than 100, 0«$ 
, persons. 




Portrait of Evangeline Adams, 

astrologer, who got her start in 

Boston, shown as she looked at 

the height of her career. 








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HENRY FORD AT WAYSIDE INN 

The famous motor magnate is shown standing beside the fireplace, where 
his dinner was being cooked in the old-fashioned way in a "Dutch oven," 

last night. 



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Rare Trademarked Early Lighting Fixture 




ONE of the rarest of "betty" lamps, 
with the maker's mark stamped into 
the iron surface on the top of the 
lamp, is shown above. These primitive 
lamps, occurring in a variety of metals, 
burned crude whale or fish oil and were 
used by the Pilgrim Fathers in this 
country, and for centuries before in the 
Old World. From the collection of a 
well-known authority on lighting, this 
lamp has been singled out because of the 
particular interest in its identification, 
it being an exceedingly rare thing to find 
a mark of any sort on the early speci- 
mens. 

The material of the lamp is iron, and 
the mark may be distinguished in front 
of the handle with a semi-circular in- 
dentation, "M & R Boker." The owner, 



in twenty years of collecting, has never 
seen another marked iron betty, but he 
knows of one other bearing the same 
name in the lamps of Mrs. J. Insley 
Blair's fine collection at Tuxedo Park, 
New York. If there are these two, there 
may be others, but the numbers which 
have survived the passing years must be 
very limited. 

The owner has been unable to learn 
anything about the inscription, nor where 
the firm "fi & R Boker" were located, 
whether they were the makers or only 
the distributors of the lamp, and is 
anxious to hear from any other collector 
who owns one, and would be especially 
grateful for any information leading to 
the identity of this firm, their date and 
place of business. 













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Wayside Inn D. A. R. Elects Delegates 
Wayside Inn Chapter, D. A. R., of 
Sudbury and Wayland held its regular 
meeting' at the home of the secretary, 
Mrs. Emma D. Wellington, in Wayland, 
on Saturday afternoon. Mrs. Alfred E. 
Sloane was elected delegate to the March 
conference, with Mrs. Francis Stearns, 
Mrs. William Hastings. Mrs. X. P. Sears, 
.Mrs. John J. Erwin, and Mrs. Roland G. 
Cutler, as alternates. Plans were made 
for the birthday lunch to be given on 
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A TRADITIONAL bride, carrying 
a sheaf of Easter lilies and 
gowned in white velvet with a 
train and a Juliet cap of velvet 
caught with orange blossoms, Ver- 
non Abbott Ladd pledged her troth 
to Gregory Vlastos of Kingston, 
Ont. at the Leslie Lindsey Memorial 
Chapel. The bride's sister and only 
attendant, Gabriella Ladd. wore a 
gown of dull gold with sleeves and 
cap of fuchsia velvet. Dr. and Mrs. 
Maynard Ladd gave a reception at 
270 Clarendon street immediately 
after the ceremony, which was per- 
formed by the Rev. Lloyd R. Gill- 
met t of Emmanuel Church. 





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-AS ANCIENT B THIS H0STE1RT 
AS ANY IN THE LAND MAY BE. 
BUILT IN THE OLD COLONIAL DAY. 
WHEN MEN LIVED IN A CRANDER WAT. 
WITH AMPLER HOSPITALITY— " 

-LONOPEUJW 



Celery 



Green Beans 



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SOUTH SUDBURY. MASS. 
December 26, 1932 



A (Efjrtfltmaa Mttm - 
1.50 

Tomato Consomme 
Croutons 



Broiled Sirloin Steak 

Broiled Chicken 

Roast Duck 



Olives 



Beets 



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Hot Rolls 

Hearts of Lettuce 

Frozen Crushed Raspberry 

Ice Cream — Cake 

Mince Pie — Cheese 

Pumpkin Pie — Cheese 

Plum Pudding — Hard Sauce 

Baked Indian Pudding — Whipped Cream 



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Friday, December 23rd, 7:30 o'clock 



LARGE BALL ROOM — WAYSIDE INN 



program 



(T^WZ 



SONG: School and Guests 



HARK! THE HERALD ANGELS SING 

Hark! the herald angels sing 
Glory to the new-born King; 
Peace on earth and mercy mild, 
God and sinners reconciled ! 
Joyful all ye nations, rise, 
Join the triumph of the skies; 
With th'angelic hosts proclaim, 
Christ is born in Bethlehem. 

Refrain: Hark! the herald angels sing, 
Glory to the new-born King. 

Mild He lays His glory by, 
Born that man no more may die, 
Born to raise the sons of earth, 
Born to give them second birth. 
Ris'n with healing in His wings, 
Light and life to all He brings, 
Hail, the Sun of Righteousness 
Hail, the Heav'n-Born Prince of Peace! 



REDSTONE SCHOOL 
Pantomine 
The Christmas Elves 

Scene: Room of a little boy and girl. 
Time: Christmas Eve. 

Cast of Characters 

Boy Bradley Way 

Girl '_ Caroline Way 

Mother Elizabeth Little 

Teddy Bear Emma Batchelder 

f James Geehan 
Soldiers -\ Gloria Bonazzoli 

I Wilbert Tighe 

Ann Davenport 

Dolls - -{ Pauline Adams 

[ Jean Geehan 

Sandman — - Lydia Bonazzoli 

f Priscilla Kirkland 

Elves J Robert Hooper 

Russell Springer 

[_ Alfred Bonazzoli 

Santa Claus Clifford Belcher 

SOUTHWEST SCHOOL 
The Shepherd Who Stayed Behind 

Scene: A rocky hillside near Jerusalem. 
Time: Night. 

Characters 

Nathan, a young shepherd — Allan Bowry 

Joel, a boy of fourteen Ernest Little 

Amos, the master of the flock George Adams 

Reuben, a young shepherd Alvin Bradshaw 

David, a middle-aged shepherd Donald Bowry 

Joseph David Bentley 

Mary Marie Nelson 

The Babe 

The Christmas Angel Marilyn Field 

Caspar Ca rlton Ellms 

Melchior Charles Buzzell 

Balthazar Paul Hanna 

The Celestial Choir Southwest School 



BOYS SCHOOL 

The Killer 

Scene. Canadian Woods. 

Time: About sunset. Christmas Eve. 

Characters 

The Killer Wallace Welch 

The Sheriff Francis Quirk 

The Girl _ Elizabeth Kirkland 

The Other Man Ralph Delagrieco 



SANTA CLAUS 



CLOSING SONG: School and Guests 

JOY TO THE WORLD! 

Joy to the world! the Lord is come; 

Let earth receive her King; 

Let ev'ry heart prepare Him room, 

And heav'n and nature sing, 

And heav'n and nature sing, 

And heav'n, and heav'n and nature sing. 

He rules the world with truth and grace 

And makes the nations prove 

The glories of His righteousness, 

And wonders of His love, 

And wonders of His love, 

And wonders, wonders of His love. 



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11 GOSPEL 
TEAMS TO 
START IN 



B. U. Theologians on 

1 3th Annual Series 

Tonight 



Tonight in 11 churches of Greater 
Boston, 11 gospel teams, composed 
of more than SO students in Boston 
' University's School of Theology, will 
start the 13th annual series of 
church services, which have become 
a custom with theological students 
at B. U. Each team, made up on an 
average of. about five men to a team, 
will spend the months of January, 
February and March preaching in 
different churches. 

HOW TEAMS ARE ASSIGNED 

The following teams have been as- 
signed for churches during the current 
month: 

Weston church — James McEldowney 
of Karlsham, la.; Henry M. Emerson 
of Washington, X. H.; John \V. Lewien 
of Hastings, Neb.; Bernard W. Lowry 
of Raynhorn, N. C, and Harry L. 
Nichols of Medford, Okla. 

Marlboro church— Stanley J. Shoe - 
maker of Columbus". P.; George M, 
Burnworth of Confluence, Penn.; How- 
ard H. Palmer of Independence, la.: 
Arthur Hopkinson, Jr., of Fitchburg, 
and Sven A. Laurin of Lowell. 

St. Mark's Church at Lawrence — Don- 
ald H. Baldwin of Fort Shaw, Mont.; 
Herdis L. Deabler of Capac, Mich.; R. 
S. H. Holthaus of Earlville, la.; Leon 
R. Stapley of Albany, X. Y.. and Elmer 
E. Beckman of La Centre, Wash. 










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